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Not unlike the majority of countries, the Canadian wireless market is one dominated by a few major players, a map broken only by a few insignificant spots created by the regional carriers in their attempt to establish themselves in the increasingly competitive landscape.  Unlike many countries, however, the three major players in Canada are fairly evenly weighted when considering subscriptions of both prepaid and postpaid customers.  Consider for a moment the disparity seen in the United States market where four major corporations control the lions share of a massive cellular market; Verizon, AT&T, Sprint and T-Mobile, between them nearly 352 million subscribers.  Of those 352 million subscribers,Verizon and AT&T control a full 70% of them with Sprint and T-Mobile controlling roughly an even split of the remaining 30%.  This allows these two companies to dominate the market and direct the future of wireless communications.

Back in Canada, however, the three major corporations that control the wireless landscape control relatively even portions of the Canadian subscriber base.  Between them, approximately 25.2 million of Canada’s approximately 27 million subscribers are provided service.  Rogers, the largest of the three has nearly 9.5 million, while Bell Wireless Affiliates (the smallest of the major carriers) is only 20% smaller, with roughly 7.7 million subscribers.  These distribution of influence, power and, ultimately, wealth amongst these three has allowed them to cover a remarkable amount of the Canadian population.

Unfortunately, with such a large country, covering actual geographic area is extremely difficult, and so wireless providers publish their coverage statistics based on the actual percentage of the population that they service.

What the numbers indicate is that a little over 80% of the Canadian population has access to high speed LTE data, and a remarkable 98% of the population has access to either HSPA+ or CDMA networks.

 

Of course, location is everything, and in the never ending carrier wars markets are always important. Service for one of these carriers may struggle greatly in Vancouver, while providing a superior experience in Ottawa.  Prospering in Edmonton, while floundering in Montreal.  Ultimately, when evaluating the carriers offering wireless service in Canada, do your homework.  Use a mapping service such as Sensorly which creates user generated maps based on actual signal strength rather than the information that the carriers publish, to give a realistic view of a services strengths and weaknesses in a given geographical region.  Research the regional carriers; WIND, SaskTel or perhaps Videotron to find rates that are appropriate for your budget and that will provide the service that you need.

Ultimately, with all of the providers in Canada currently, there is definitely a provider that can give you the service you need at a price you can appreciate.  Just remember to do your homework.

Not unlike the majority of countries, the Canadian wireless market is one dominated by a few major players, a map broken only by a few insignificant spots created by the regional carriers in their attempt to establish themselves in the increasingly competitive landscape.  Unlike many countries, however, the three major players in Canada are fairly evenly weighted when considering subscriptions of both prepaid and postpaid customers.  Consider for a moment the disparity seen in the United States market where four major corporations control the lions share of a massive cellular market; Verizon, AT&T, Sprint and T-Mobile, between them nearly 352 million subscribers.  Of those 352 million subscribers,Verizon and AT&T control a full 70% of them with Sprint and T-Mobile controlling roughly an even split of the remaining 30%.  This allows these two companies to dominate the market and direct the future of wireless communications.

Back in Canada, however, the three major corporations that control the wireless landscape control relatively even portions of the Canadian subscriber base.  Between them, approximately 25.2 million of Canada’s approximately 27 million subscribers are provided service.  Rogers, the largest of the three has nearly 9.5 million, while Bell Wireless Affiliates (the smallest of the major carriers) is only 20% smaller, with roughly 7.7 million subscribers.  These distribution of influence, power and, ultimately, wealth amongst these three has allowed them to cover a remarkable amount of the Canadian population.

Unfortunately, with such a large country, covering actual geographic area is extremely difficult, and so wireless providers publish their coverage statistics based on the actual percentage of the population that they service.

What the numbers indicate is that a little over 80% of the Canadian population has access to high speed LTE data, and a remarkable 98% of the population has access to either HSPA+ or CDMA networks.

Of course, location is everything, and in the never ending carrier wars markets are always important. Service for one of these carriers may struggle greatly in Vancouver, while providing a superior experience in Ottawa.  Prospering in Edmonton, while floundering in Montreal.  Ultimately, when evaluating the carriers offering wireless service in Canada, do your homework.  Use a mapping service such as Sensorly which creates user generated maps based on actual signal strength rather than the information that the carriers publish, to give a realistic view of a services strengths and weaknesses in a given geographical region.  Research the regional carriers; WIND, SaskTel or perhaps Videotron to find rates that are appropriate for your budget and that will provide the service that you need.

Ultimately, with all of the providers in Canada currently, there is definitely a provider that can give you the service you need at a price you can appreciate.  Just remember to do your homework.

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